Blind faith in authority

We live in an age of the most careless thinking and at the same time it is an age of the blindest trust in authority. People live to-day entirely under the impression that they must believe in, they must recognise authority, that they must have the sanction of outside powers. They desire a warrant for this or that. For the most part men do not consider to-day that it is an individual concern, that they will eventually have to take up the matter for themselves! So, they go to whom ‘right and law is bequeathed like a hereditary sickness’ and accept conclusions without weighing how those conclusions were reached; for they consider it right to accept authority blindly.

A man is ill — he takes not the least trouble to learn the simplest thing about the illness. Why should he? We have recognised and certified physicians whose business it is to look after our bodies; we need not trouble in the least about them!

If information on any subject be desired, people go to those who ought to know, to the theologian, to the philosopher, to this one or to that.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 165 – ON THE DUTY OF CLEAR, SOUND THINKING – Dornach, 1st January 1916

Previously posted on April 4, 2020

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About Kamaloca

The fact that we live through every detail of our past life in reverse order, brings with it that we can only now have a true knowledge of our own actions, for we experience their effects on ourselves. In the case of every action we now experience the soul-condition of the person against whom the action turned. We experience the pains and joys which we caused to other people, we experience them from within. In Kamaloca there is nothing which we did to others which does not become our own experience. Here we must apply this sentence: you will reap what you sowed.

Take one example which applies to this retrogressive experience: vivisection. This is closely connected with the materialistic direction of modern science. The position of the Middle Ages would have thought it stupid to study life by cutting of a living body and destroy in life. At that time many people, and physicians in particular, were still clairvoyant and they could therefore see through the physical body. But this power of vision was lost and because we can no longer look into the inner depths of the human organism, people began to cut it up and to dissect it. But vivisectors cut into living life. After death Karma, the law of cause and effect, becomes active. The intention that leads to vivisection comes less into consideration. The vivisector must experience in himself the results of his deeds. In kamaloka he must now endure and live through every pain which he inflicted an animal. Later on the scientific intention which prompted him to vivisect will be interwoven with his Karma.

Source Rudolf Steiner – GA 94 – Popular Occultism: Lecture 5: LIFE BETWEEN DEATH AND A NEW BIRTH – Leipzig, 3 July, 1906

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Blind faith in authority

We live in an age of the most careless thinking and at the same time it is an age of the blindest trust in authority. People live to-day entirely under the impression that they must believe in, they must recognise authority, that they must have the sanction of outside powers. They desire a warrant for this or that. For the most part men do not consider to-day that it is an individual concern, that they will eventually have to take up the matter for themselves! So, they go to whom ‘right and law is bequeathed like a hereditary sickness’ and accept conclusions without weighing how those conclusions were reached; for they consider it right to accept authority blindly.

A man is ill — he takes not the least trouble to learn the simplest thing about the illness. Why should he? We have recognised and certified physicians whose business it is to look after our bodies; we need not trouble in the least about them!

If information on any subject be desired, people go to those who ought to know, to the theologian, to the philosopher, to this one or to that.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 165 – ON THE DUTY OF CLEAR, SOUND THINKING – Dornach, 1st January 1916