The occultist asserts nothing else than what any other scholar asserts in his own field

The mystic, the occultist, does not assert anything that a scholar cannot assert in his field. Let’s say that someone tells you a mathematical truth. If you haven’t studied mathematics you don’t have the necessary knowledge to verify this truth. No one will deny that to judge a mathematical truth the necessary capacities must be attained first. No authority can decide about such a truth, only the individual who has experienced it can judge. And only someone who has experienced an esoteric truth can judge it. 

Our contemporaries, however, demand that the occultist prove what he says to the satisfaction of every average intelligence. They stand by the sentence: what is true must be provable and everyone must be able to understand it. The occultist, however, asserts nothing else than what any other scholar asserts in his own field, and he demands nothing more than every mathematician also demands.

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Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 89 – Theosophic/Esoteric Cosmology: Spiritual Cosmology – Berlin, 26th May, 1904

Translation: Frank Thomas Smith

Previously posted on May 13, 2017

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The occultist asserts nothing else than what any other scholar asserts in his own field

The mystic, the occultist, does not assert anything that a scholar cannot assert in his field. Let’s say that someone tells you a mathematical truth. If you haven’t studied mathematics you don’t have the necessary knowledge to verify this truth. No one will deny that to judge a mathematical truth the necessary capacities must be attained first. No authority can decide about such a truth, only the individual who has experienced it can judge. And only someone who has experienced an esoteric truth can judge it.

Our contemporaries, however, demand that the occultist prove what he says to the satisfaction of every average intelligence. They stand by the sentence: what is true must be provable and everyone must be able to understand it. The occultist, however, asserts nothing else than what any other scholar asserts in his own field, and he demands nothing more than every mathematician also demands.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 89 – Theosophic/Esoteric Cosmology: Spiritual Cosmology – Berlin, 26th May, 1904

Translation: Frank Thomas Smith

If someone is sitting in a corner thinking: “I don’t like that nonsense, I hate it.”

When we speak on the physical plane and tell our thoughts to someone, we have the feeling that our thoughts come from our soul, that we have to remember them at this particular moment. Speaking as a true occultist and not someone who just tells his experiences from memory, we will feel that our thoughts arise as living beings. We must be glad if we are blessed at the right moment with the approach of a thought as a real being.

When you express your thoughts in the physical world, for example, as a lecturer, you will find it easier to give a talk for the thirtieth time than you did the first time. If, however, you speak as an occultist, thoughts always have to approach you and then depart again. Just as someone paying you the thirtieth visit had to make his way to you thirty times, the living thought we express for the thirtieth time has to come to us thirty times as it did the first time; our memory is of absolutely no use here.

If you express an idea on the physical level and someone is sitting in a corner thinking, “I don’t like that nonsense, I hate it,” you will not be particularly bothered by it. You have prepared your ideas and present them regardless of the positive or negative thoughts of someone in the audience. But if as an esotericist you let thoughts approach you, they could be delayed and kept away by someone who hates them or who hates the speaker. And the forces blocking that thought must be overcome because we are dealing with living beings and not merely with abstract ideas.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 154 – The Presence of the Dead on the Spiritual Path – Lecture Four: The Presence of the Dead in our LifeParis, May 25, 1914