Letter from Steiner to his sister and brother

Dornach, November 12, 1924

My dear sister and brother,

First of all, my dear sister, the warmest and most beautiful thoughts for your name day. Although I must be far from you, I think of you a lot on this day. I hope your health will improve soon. Count Polzer was here yesterday; we talked about you. He is bringing the medicine for you.

It has been a busy year for me this year. So many trips had to be made. To Paris, to Holland, to England. In between always the trips to Stuttgart. Then a long journey to Breslau.

Oh, my dear brother and sister, I am so sorry that I could not visit you for such a long time; I give myself hope that before not too long, it will be possible again. Now I think of you a lot, my dear ones, and am with you in my thoughts. After the travels, I have a lot to do here with the new building of the Goetheanum. Yes, there is much to do.

As I write this, Marie is travelling to give lectures; she will only return in the next few days. Therefore, she cannot personally add her greetings to this letter. But you can be sure that she sends you the best wishes from her heart.

With warmest greetings and kisses to you and Gustave,

From your Rudolf

Source (German): BRIEFE – BAND II 1890-1925 – GA 039 – letter 649 (page 480-481)

Translated by Nesta Carsten-Krüger

See also: The last months in the life of Rudolf Steiner (1 of 2)

The last months in the life of Rudolf Steiner (2 of 2)

 

The Noodle Soup

It was in the years before 1910 – possibly in Munich – when, during his lecture tours, Rudolf Steiner  often lived in private pensions where he took meals as well. It also happened that his meals were accompanied  by a noodle soup with plenty of herbs. Steiner liked the soup so much, that he helped himself to a second – maybe a third bowl.

As he had to leave the city the following morning, Steiner came to the train station accompanied by Miss von Sivers and the hostess. Steiner had already stepped into the waiting train – he liked to travel in a compartment for himself – while the two women stood on the platform exchanging goodbyes.

Suddenly, the maker of the good soup pulled a preserving glass out of her handbag and gave it to Miss von Sivers, saying: “Dear Miss von Sivers, yesterday the doctor praised my soup so much, and ate so much of it, that I cooked some extra soup for him. Please take it. You can instantly warm it up on arrival.  I’ve also written the recipe down in case you ever wanted to cook it for yourself! “

Whoever is familiar with Ms Marie Steiner-von Sivers, can only imagine the negative frame of mind she was now in; once the train was out of town and in open countryside, she opened the window, poured the soup out, and threw the glass jar after it.

At the next station – where the “D” trains used to stop even longer than today – was heard, on the platform, loud grumbling from the conductor: “What a bunch of pigs! Why do we have a toilet in the wagon? Can people not go there when sick? My whole wagon is now full of puke! “

Rudolf Steiner heard this and left the carriage. The car looked really dirty, with noodles splattered by the wind across the outer wall and windows of the train. Miss von Sivers stood there with a flushed face.

“Now,” said Steiner, “the man is quite right! One cannot blame him.” He then grabbed his handkerchief  out of the back of his coat and began wiping the noodles off the wagon; he only stopped when it again looked somewhat decent. This is how Steiner occasionally corrected  the impulsiveness of the late Mrs Marie Steiner.

Source (German): Sie Mensch von einem Menschen! Rudolf Steiner in Anekdoten by Wolfgang G. Vögele (page 78-79)

Anonymous translator

Previously posted on May 1, 2017

The last months in the life of Rudolf Steiner (2 – End)

On March 20, 1925 (ten days before his death) Steiner wrote to Marie:

My health is improving, only slowly. I hope that in time, I will be able to work on the building model (design for the second Goetheanum) in order to avoid delays.

On March 27, 1925 (three days before his death) Steiner wrote to J.C. Träxler, a tradesman who had taken the brother and sister of Steiner into his own house in Horn.

Dear Mr Träxler,

I was saddened to hear of my sister’s eye condition. (She had an eye disease and, around 1925, became completely blind). Unfortunately, I am so sick myself that I cannot think of visiting her, but I would not want my sister to become worried by the news of my illness. I am so very grateful to you, honourable Mr. Träxler, for taking such loving care of my brother and sister. I think that Mrs Barth, who I know well, was a good choice. (She was a distant relative who cared for Steiner’s brother and sister until the autumn of 1926).

Will you give the good woman my cordial greetings? Mrs. Barth’s fee will, as usual, be settled on my behalf by my friend Count Polzer. I must leave it to our friend, Dr. Glass, to decide whether an examination of the left eye will be necessary. He will write me with his opinion, once he has been to Horn. I will also write to him.

Thanks again,

Yours sincerely,

Rudolf Steiner

Source (German): GA 262 (letter 235, page 458) en GA 39 (letter 651, page 482)

Anonymous translator

schweizergarten-_rudolf_steiner_monument_2007-04

Rudolf Steiner monument in Schweizergarten, a park in Vienna

300px-rudolf_steiner_denkmal_schweizergarten_02

Previously posted on July 15, 2016

The last months in the life of Rudolf Steiner (1 0f 2)

During the last six months of his life, a serious intestine illness confined Rudolf Steiner to bed. Little is known about this illness and Steiner neither talked nor wrote about it, except occasionally in letters sent to his wife Marie von Sivers.

Here are excerpts from those letters.

On October 6, 1924 he wrote to Marie:  

I had to bite the bullet myself today and sent the Berliners this telegram: “My physical condition makes it absolutely impossible to travel in the coming months. This is the reason why, much to my regret, you will not be able to count on my presence.”

You can not imagine how bitter I feel, but I foresee that nursing and absolute tranquility may alone bring some comfort in the coming weeks. Therefore, do not worry. The symptoms are not life threatening. They are however persistent and will not go away quickly. This haemorrhoid illness seems completely harmless, but to me, is the worst, because it forces me to lie down almost motionless, as I have been since you departed.

On October 11, 1924 he wrote to Marie

The daily haemorrhoid  therapies are terribly painful and far from pleasant, but have really brought about a significant improvement. It is just that things cannot be hurried.

Do not worry about me, all that can be done is being done, and the care I am receiving is second to none. It is just that the therapy is unpleasant and the treatment painful. It is never an agreeable moment when the two doctors (Ita Wegman and Ludwig Noll) must begin the haemorrhoid treatments. But all in all, things are still moving well ahead.

To be continued

Source (German): GA 262 (letter 202, page 413) en GA 262 (letter 207, page 420)

Anonymous translator

schweizergarten-_rudolf_steiner_monument_2007-04

Rudolf Steiner monument in Schweizergarten, a park in Vienna

300px-rudolf_steiner_denkmal_schweizergarten_02

Previously posted on July 14, 2016

The last months in the life of Rudolf Steiner (2 – End)

On March 20, 1925 (ten days before his death) Steiner wrote to Marie:

My health is improving, only slowly. I hope that in time, I will be able to work on the building model (design for the second Goetheanum) in order to avoid delays.

On March 27, 1925 (three days before his death) Steiner wrote to J.C. Träxler, a tradesman who had taken the brother and sister of Steiner into his own house in Horn.

Dear Mr Träxler,

I was saddened to hear of my sister’s eye condition. (She had an eye disease and, around 1925, became completely blind). Unfortunately, I am so sick myself that I cannot think of visiting her, but I would not want my sister to become worried by the news of my illness. I am so very grateful to you, honourable Mr. Träxler, for taking such loving care of my brother and sister. I think that Mrs Barth, who I know well, was a good choice. (She was a distant relative who cared for Steiner’s brother and sister until the autumn of 1926)Will you give the good woman my cordial greetings? Mrs. Barth’s fee will, as usual, be settled on my behalf by my friend Count Polzer. I must leave it to our friend, Dr. Glass, to decide whether an examination of the left eye will be necessary. He will write me with his opinion, once he has been to Horn. I will also write to him.

Thanks again, Yours sincerely,

Rudolf Steiner

Source (German): GA 262 (letter 235, page 458) en GA 39 (letter 651, page 482)

Anonymous translator

Rudolf Steiner monument in Schweizergarten, a park in Vienna