The Master has said

We must not assume that everything which looks like blind faith is so. For example, we are told that in the old Pythagorean Mystery Schools  there was a familiar phrase: The Master has said. But this never meant: The Master has said, therefore we believe it! For his students it meant something like this: The Master has said; therefore it demands that we should reflect on it and see how far we can get with it if we bring all our forces to bear upon it. To “believe” need not always imply a blind belief springing from a desire for self-annihilation. It need not be blind belief if you accept communications springing from spiritual research because you trust the researcher. You may have learnt that his statements are in strictly logical form, and that in other realms, where his utterances can be tested, he is logical and does not talk nonsense. On this verifiable ground the student can hold a well-founded belief that the speaker, when he is talking about things not yet known to the student, has an equally sure basis for his statements.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 58 – Metamorphoses of the Soul, Vol 1: Lecture 6: Asceticism and Illness – Berlin, 11th November 1909

Translated by Charles Davy and Christian von Arnim

Previously posted on March 21, 2018

pythagoras-Pythagoras-Art-by-J.-Augustus-Knapp-circa-1926

Pythagoras

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Immensely important: Don’t call upon the intellect too early

When the child has outgrown the stage of authority, when he has attained puberty and through this has physiologically quite a different connection with the outer world than before, he also attains in soul and body (in his bodily life in its most comprehensive sense) a quite different relation-ship to the world than he had earlier. This is the time of the awakening of Spirit in Man. This now is the time when the human being seeks out the rational and logical aspect in all verbal expression. Only now can we hope to appeal with any success to the intellect in our education and instruction. It is immensely important that we do not consciously or unconsciously call upon the intellect prematurely, as people are so prone to do to-day.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 305 – Spiritual Ground: Lecture I: The Necessity for a Spiritual Insight – Oxford, August 16, 1922

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Not as impractical and unworldly as it may seem

Because man was entirely focused on the physical world, it monopolised his whole interest. That was a necessary stage in human development. Today, people often think: If I make an effort to live well, I will, when I die, experience what is to be experienced after death. That may seem quite logical at first, but is nonetheless entirely false, for the spiritual world will weave a veil of blindness around those who die with indifference to it, causing them to see nothing. Thinking about the transcendental world is therefore not as impractical and unworldly as it may seem.

Source (German): Rudolf Steiner – GA 266a – Aus den Inhalten der esoterischen Stunden – Stuttgart, August 16, 1908 (page 420)

Anonymous translator

Previously posted on October 13, 2017

The Master has said

We must not assume that everything which looks like blind faith is so. For example, we are told that in the old Pythagorean Mystery Schools  there was a familiar phrase: The Master has said. But this never meant: The Master has said, therefore we believe it! For his students it meant something like this: The Master has said; therefore it demands that we should reflect on it and see how far we can get with it if we bring all our forces to bear upon it. To “believe” need not always imply a blind belief springing from a desire for self-annihilation. It need not be blind belief if you accept communications springing from spiritual research because you trust the researcher. You may have learnt that his statements are in strictly logical form, and that in other realms, where his utterances can be tested, he is logical and does not talk nonsense. On this verifiable ground the student can hold a well-founded belief that the speaker, when he is talking about things not yet known to the student, has an equally sure basis for his statements.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 58 – Metamorphoses of the Soul, Vol 1: Lecture 6: Asceticism and Illness – Berlin, 11th November 1909

Translated by Charles Davy and Christian von Arnim

Previously posted on 19th January 2015

Not as impractical and unworldly as it may seem

Because man was entirely focused on the physical world, it monopolised his whole interest. That was a necessary stage in human development. Today, people often think: If I make an effort to live well, I will, when I die, experience what is to be experienced after death. That may seem quite logical at first, but is nonetheless entirely false, for the spiritual world will weave a veil of blindness around those who die with indifference to it, causing them to see nothing. Thinking about the transcendental world is therefore not as impractical and unworldly as it may seem.

Source (German): Rudolf Steiner – GA 266a – Aus den Inhalten der esoterischen Stunden – Stuttgart, August 16, 1908 (page 420)

Anonymous translator

Previously posted on August 10, 2016