Waldorf Schools: Something made by a person a little touched in the head

Naturally the education officers regarded what was done in other schools (than the Waldorf School) as a kind of ideal. It is true they always said: one cannot attain the ideal, one can only do one’s best under the circumstances. Life demands this or that of us. But one finds in actual practice when one has dealings with them that they regard all existing arrangements set up either by state authorities or other authorities as exceptionally good, and look upon an institution such as the Waldorf School as a kind of crank hobby, a vagary, something made by a person a little touched in the head.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 305 – Spiritual Ground of Education – Lecture VII: The Organisation of the Waldorf School – Oxford 23rd August 1922

Translated by Daphne Harwood

Previously posted on August 5, 2014

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Waldorf Schools: Something made by a person a little touched in the head

Naturally the education officers regarded what was done in other schools (than the Waldorf School) as a kind of ideal. It is true they always said: one cannot attain the ideal, one can only do one’s best under the circumstances. Life demands this or that of us. But one finds in actual practice when one has dealings with them that they regard all existing arrangements set up either by state authorities or other authorities as exceptionally good, and look upon an institution such as the Waldorf School as a kind of crank hobby, a vagary, something made by a person a little touched in the head.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 305 – Spiritual Ground of Education – Lecture VII: The Organisation of the Waldorf School – Oxford 23rd August 1922

Previously posted on October 7, 2013

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Waldorf Schools: Something made by a person a little touched in the head

Naturally the education officers regarded what was done in other schools (than the Waldorf School) as a kind of ideal. It is true they always said: one cannot attain the ideal, one can only do one’s best under the circumstances. Life demands this or that of us. But one finds in actual practice when one has dealings with them that they regard all existing arrangements set up either by state authorities or other authorities as exceptionally good, and look upon an institution such as the Waldorf School as a kind of crank hobby, a vagary, something made by a person a little touched in the head.

Source: GA 305 – Spiritual Ground of Education – Lecture VII: The Organisation of the Waldorf School – Oxford 23rd August 1922