Lord, Lord!

Thus we comprehend the Christ correctly by grasping, in the right way, this word of the Gospel: “Whoever utters incessantly the cry: Lord, Lord! or Christ, Christ! should not, therefore, be considered a true Christian.” Anthroposophy is often reproached for speaking less of the Christ than does external religion. Then I often say to those who blame Anthroposophy: “Is there not an ancient Commandment recognized also by Christians, but forgotten in this eternal mentioning of the Christ: `Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain?’ This is one of the ten Commandments.”

Whoever speaks ceaselessly of the Christ; whoever has the Christ’s name constantly on his lips, sins against the sacredness of His name. Anthroposophy wants to be Christian in all it does and is. Therefore it cannot be reproached for speaking too little of the Christ. The consciousness that the Christ is living permeates everything brought forth by Anthroposophy. And thus it does not want to have Lord, Lord! incessantly on its lips. The less it speaks of the name “Christ,” the more truly does it desire to be Christian.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 226 – Man’s Being, His Destiny and World-Evolution: Lecture VI – Kristiana, 21st May 1923

Translated by Erna McArthur

Previously posted on February 18, 2017

Blasphemy

A frequently heard statement that’s misused more than most is: I am a Christian. An esoteric should realize that being a Christian is a distant ideal that he must constantly try to attain. To live like a Christian mainly means to accept whatever destiny may bring us with equanimity, to never grumble about the Gods’ work, and to joyfully accept whatever they send. It means to let the sentence “Look at the birds of the air, they don’t sow, reap or store in barns, yet your heavenly Father feeds them” pass over into your flesh and blood. We’re living in accordance with this saying if we thankfully accept what’s given to us. If we don’t do that it becomes blasphemy in our mouth.

do-not-worry-about-your-life


Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 266 – From the Contents of Esoteric Classes – Esoteric Lessons Part II – Stuttgart, 31st December 1910

 Previously posted on August 20, 2016

Blasphemy

A frequently heard statement that’s misused more than most is: I am a Christian. An esoteric should realize that being a Christian is a distant ideal that he must constantly try to attain. To live like a Christian mainly means to accept whatever destiny may bring us with equanimity, to never grumble about the Gods’ work, and to joyfully accept whatever they send. It means to let the sentence “Look at the birds of the air, they don’t sow, reap or store in barns, yet your heavenly Father feeds them” pass over into your flesh and blood. We’re living in accordance with this saying if we thankfully accept what’s given to us. If we don’t do that it becomes blasphemy in our mouth.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 266 – From the Contents of Esoteric Classes – Esoteric Lessons Part II – Stuttgart, 31st December 1910

 Previously posted on September 20, 2014

No occult school sees in its teaching and requirements anything like a moral law valid for all mankind

Yesterday we concluded by outlining the three methods of occult development: the Eastern, the Christian and the Rosicrucian. Today we will begin by going more closely into the details which distinguish these three paths. But first I should say that no occult school sees in its teaching and requirements anything like a moral law valid for all mankind. The requirements apply only to those who deliberately choose to devote themselves to a particular occult training. You can, for instance, be a very good Christian and fulfil everything that the Christian religion prescribes for the laity without undergoing a Christian occult training. It goes without saying that you can be a good man and come to a form of the higher life without any occult training.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 95 – At the Gates of Spiritual Science: Lecture XIII: Oriental and Christian Training – Stuttgart, 3rd September 1906

Translated by E.H. Goddard & Charles Davy

912LOTyFGZL

Previously posted on June 9, 2014

Blasphemy

A frequently heard statement that’s misused more than most is: I am a Christian. An esoteric should realize that being a Christian is a distant ideal that he must constantly try to attain. To live like a Christian mainly means to accept whatever destiny may bring us with equanimity, to never grumble about the Gods’ work, and to joyfully accept whatever they send. It means to let the sentence “Look at the birds of the air, they don’t sow, reap or store in barns, yet your heavenly Father feeds them” pass over into your flesh and blood. We’re living in accordance with this saying if we thankfully accept what’s given to us. If we don’t do that it becomes blasphemy in our mouth.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 266 – From the Contents of Esoteric Classes – Esoteric Lessons Part IIStuttgart, 31st December 1910

254ef569f014f791a83746afb7cb39c5