Utility and material advantage

If we really want to support progress, then we would not search for the practicality of something, but much more evaluate whether it is beautiful and noble. […] It is terrible to have to perceive how many thousands of people today are, since earliest childhood directed towards no other activity but that which is designed to bring material advantage and which is to be pursued merely for the sake of utility, cut off in life from the beautiful and artistic. In the poorest elementary schools, the most beautiful works of art should hang, that would bring infinite blessings for human development.

Source (German): Rudolf Steiner – GA 266a – Aus den Inhalten der esoterischen Stunden – Munich, January 16, 1908 (page 299)

Translated by Nesta Carsten-Krüger

Previously posted on September 10, 2017

The fruitfulness in things is not in what is lacking in them, but in what they have

Another important quality is the “yea saying” sense. This can be developed in one who in all things has an eye for the good, beautiful, and purposeful aspects of life, and not, primarily, for the blameworthy, ugly and contradictory. In Persian poetry there is a beautiful legend about Christ, which illustrates the meaning of this quality. A dead dog is lying on the road. Among the passersby is Christ. All the others turn away from the ugly sight; only Christ pauses and speaks admiringly of the animal’s beautiful teeth. It is possible to look at things in this way, and he who earnestly seeks for it may find in all things, even the most repulsive, something worthy of acknowledgment. The fruitfulness in things is not in what is lacking in them, but in what they have.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 12 – The Stages of Higher Knowledge – Chapter 1

Translation by Lisa Monges and Floyd McKnight

Previously posted on September 3, 2014

Utility and material advantage

If we really want to support progress, then we would not search for the practicality of something, but much more evaluate whether it is beautiful and noble. […] It is terrible to have to perceive how many thousands of people today are, since earliest childhood directed towards no other activity but that which is designed to bring material advantage and which is to be pursued merely for the sake of utility, cut off in life from the beautiful and artistic. In the poorest elementary schools, the most beautiful works of art should hang, that would bring infinite blessings for human development.

Source (German): Rudolf Steiner – GA 266a – Aus den Inhalten der esoterischen Stunden – Munich, January 16, 1908 (page 299)

Translated by Nesta Carsten-Krüger

Previously posted on September 12, 2016 

The fruitfulness in things is not in what is lacking in them, but in what they have

Another important quality is the “yea saying” sense. This can be developed in one who in all things has an eye for the good, beautiful, and purposeful aspects of life, and not, primarily, for the blameworthy, ugly and contradictory. In Persian poetry there is a beautiful legend about Christ, which illustrates the meaning of this quality. A dead dog is lying on the road. Among the passersby is Christ. All the others turn away from the ugly sight; only Christ pauses and speaks admiringly of the animal’s beautiful teeth. It is possible to look at things in this way, and he who earnestly seeks for it may find in all things, even the most repulsive, something worthy of acknowledgment. The fruitfulness in things is not in what is lacking in them, but in what they have. 

Source: GA 12 – The Stages of Higher Knowledge – Chapter 1

Previously posted on October 10, 2013

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The fruitfulness in things is not in what is lacking in them, but in what they have

Another important quality is the “yea saying” sense. This can be developed in one who in all things has an eye for the good, beautiful, and purposeful aspects of life, and not, primarily, for the blameworthy, ugly and contradictory. In Persian poetry there is a beautiful legend about Christ, which illustrates the meaning of this quality. A dead dog is lying on the road. Among the passersby is Christ. All the others turn away from the ugly sight; only Christ pauses and speaks admiringly of the animal’s beautiful teeth. It is possible to look at things in this way, and he who earnestly seeks for it may find in all things, even the most repulsive, something worthy of acknowledgment. The fruitfulness in things is not in what is lacking in them, but in what they have. 

Source: GA 12 – The Stages of Higher Knowledge – Chapter 1